Ordering Your Private World by Gordon MacDonald

Ordering Your Private World (W Publishing, 2017) by Gordon MacDonald is a book for any person feeling tossed around by this crazy world. Is your desk covered in clutter, your oil change way past due, and you feel like your day drives you rather than you driving your day? This book is for you. Ordering Your Private World is a book about spiritual formation, starting at the core.

MacDonald quoted E. Stanley Jones final thoughts on his death bed. Stanley said, "The innermost strands are the strongest" (143). His point was that all the stuff around the outside is could break away so long as the core would hold to the very end. That's the idea of Ordering Your Private World. But MacDonald takes it further, arguing that when the private world (the core) the public world falls into order too.

MacDonald opens every chapter with an illustration. These include that of a submarine jarring around but the deck was under control, a POW holding on to God from what was planted in earlier times, gardens, ropes, and all sorts of other easy-to-see pictures that help make understanding the importance of a well-ordered spiritual core. The first two-thirds of the book offers compelling reasoning for having Christ at the center of one's life, while the latter part of the book offers some simple "how-to" ways to get started with spiritual formation. Most of us do not have an ordered private world. Pastors are no different and this book is good for pastors and non-pastors alike.

This book is filled with gold nuggets and it's like sifting through soft beach sand to unearth the best stuff. It's easy and enjoyable. Even the sand is warm and inviting. In his 70's at the time of the revised and updated version, MacDonald has a lifetime of experience to draw from, making the book rich and more helpful.

Looking to dig into a deeper walk with Christ? Seeking to get centered and stable in an upside-down world? This book is for you. Pick up Ordering Your Private World wherever you buy books (which is probably Amazon.com).

Unscripted: "Eastern Orthodox Easter 2019"

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Jared Jenkins attended the Eastern Orthodox Easter service again. In typical Salty Believer Unscripted, Bryan and Jared and looking at the good things from the service, the things that we are humbly in disagreement with, and the things the western evangelical church could learn.

One of the very early Salty Believer Unscripted podcasts was recorded on location many years ago. Tim Lunn was also a part of that podcast. And there have been a few after that, too. Follow this link to listen to that first podcast on location. We also discussed our experience about that service a week later. You can listen to those thoughts here.

As we’ve been podcasting for many years now, and either hold a doctorate or are close to having one, we hope our thoughts and discussion has matured some. Check out Jared’s reflection on the Eastern Orthodox Easter service in 2019.

Find more podcasts like this, as well as many interviews with Christian pastors, professors, authors, and others from all across the US and Canada on our Salty Believer Unscripted page. And be sure to subscribe to the Salty Believer Unscripted on your favorite podcast app, or use these links:
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Believer's Baptism Should Be Taken Seriously

I’m always a bit uneasy when I’m reminded that some of my favorite authors, pastors, preachers, and theologians hold to a position on baptism I just don’t see strongly presented in Scripture. There’s an argument for infant sprinkling that draws on some ideas about God’s people and circumcision, but that idea is nowhere near as clear and compelling as the idea of baptism after regeneration. Romans 6 paints a profound picture of baptism as the symbolic death, burial, and resurrection with Christ, after regeneration.

Who is marked in the Church? Those who are elect, born-again, regenerate saints or everyone and we’ll hope some stick because they are elect and will someday be regenerate? Which one seems more likely when we read Scripture?

I also am uneasy when people use one of the the most pointed pictures of baptism (death, burial, and resurrection with Jesus) as an argument why believers don’t need to be baptized. While baptism is not a saving act, it is an important act of obedience. And the thief on the cross argues for that too.

I recently preached a sermon at Redeeming Life Church where I took a hard look at baptism from Scripture, including examples from Scripture, an example from the Protestant Reformation, and an modern-day example that our brothers and sisters around the world are facing. You may listen to my sermon, “Be Baptized” from Matthew 28:19 here:

You may find other sermons I’ve preached at Redeeming Life and elsewhere here.

Unscripted: "The Missing Link"

Bryan’s wife was recently doing a study about understanding God’s will and felt something was off. Nearly anybody who was a Christian in American in the late 80’s and early 90’s would have be familiar with this study. Most probably did the study in there churches and Sunday school programs. Most probably didn’t even notice the gigantic leaps the popular author made with Scripture. But he’s not the only author to make such miss-steps. These kind of failures can be found everywhere, especially in popular books and popular preaching.

Bryan Catherman and Jared Jenkins take a look at the “mission premise” in this episode of Salty Believer Unscripted. It’s about learning to identify the mission but assumed bridge. After listening to this week’s episode, you may never look at popular authors and Bible studies in the same way.

Listen to this episode here:

Find more podcasts like this, as well as many interviews with Christian pastors, professors, authors, and others from all across the US and Canada on our Salty Believer Unscripted page. And be sure to subscribe to the Salty Believer Unscripted on your favorite podcast app, or use these links:
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The Imperfect Disciple by Jared Wilson

The Imperfect Disciple: Grace for People Who Can't Get Their Act Together (Baker Books, 2017) by Jared Wilson is exactly what it claims to be. Wilson said, "I want to write a discipleship book for normal people, for people like me who know that discipleship means following Jesus--and we know that following Jesus is totally worth it, because Jesus is the end-all, be-all--but we often find that following Jesus takes us to some pretty difficult places" (14). A couple of pages before this statement, he shares his concern for the sea of discipleship books that inadequately get to the life realities that really matter. They stay too "Sunday school." The Imperfect Disciple is not one of those books.

A friend of mine nailed the description of this book while trying to describe the kind of discipleship book Wilson did not want to write. My friend said, "I'm so tired of those books that say, 'I used to struggle with this or that, but now that I've got in all figured out, let me tell you about it.'" He said, "This book [The Imperfect Disciple] is so refreshing because it's not one of those books." Because Wilson is honest and vulnerable about his journey--even where he's at right now--the book lives up to its tag line.

The unique aspect of The Imperfect Disciple is the assumption that the disciple first needs to cut through all the expectations and stereotypes and misunderstands of both the gospel and discipleship. Each chapter has an angle that sees who Christ is, who the disciple could become, and how the gospel makes that happen without being too direct or in-your-face. The reader is subtly invited into a journey with Jesus. But it's not that obvious because these things are buried in a subtle structure of storytelling. Jared Wilson is much more of a storyteller than a 'how-to' writer. He’s creative. It makes the chapters interesting and easy to read.

Each chapter title sounds about like one a person would expect to find in a discipleship book. For example, Sin and the Art of Soul Maintenance or The Nine Irrefutable Laws of Fellowship. However, each chapter also has a tag line that's far closer to the actual chapter than its title. These include When You Don't See the Advantage of Being at the Bottom, When You Think God Is Giving You the Silent Treatment, and When You Wonder If It Could Get Any Worse.

This is the book for the guy or gal in the pew, trying to live out the Christian life but finding it's not always as easy as everyone else makes it out to be.

For some, it might take a chapter or two to get accustomed to Wilson's writing style. The book is written in a conversational, chit-chatty tone that's probably better suited for a TED Talk than a non-fiction book. It can be distracting at times, but it's not much different from many popular books published in the same year. At the same time, some of the book's tone opens up a path for great honesty and rawness. It's a curse and a strength.

I highly recommend this book to anyone wanting to get a jumpstart or reboot on his or her view and understanding of what it means to walk with Jesus. It's a refreshing look at the power and reality of the gospel. Pick up a copy of The Imperfect Disciple: Grace for People Who Can't Get Their Act Together wherever books are sold.

Unscripted: "Critical Scholarship"

What is critical scholarship? How should we view scholars who study the Bible but don’t believe it’s true? Should we be afraid of this kind of scholarship? Can it helpful? In this episode of Salty Believer Unscripted, Bryan Catherman and Jared Jenkins discuss critical scholarship.

Listen to the episode here:

Find more podcasts like this, as well as many interviews with Christian pastors, professors, authors, and others from all across the US and Canada on our Salty Believer Unscripted page. And be sure to subscribe to the Salty Believer Unscripted on your favorite podcast app, or use these links:
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"Your Future Self With Thank You" with Drew Dyck

Author Drew Dyck has a new book out called, Your Future Self Will Thank You: Secrets to Self-Control from the Bible and Brain-Science (2019, Moody Publishers). He join Bryan Catherman to discuss the book, publishing, and the new habits he developed in the process of writing the book. Drew is an editor at Moody Publishers and was previously an editor at the Leadership Journal. His work has been featured in Outreach Magazine, Christianity Today, CNN, the Huffington Post, and other magazines. He’s also the author of Generation Ex-Christian and Yawning at Tigers. His new book is available wherever books are sold.

Listen to the conversation here:

Find more podcasts like this, as well as many interviews with Christian pastors, professors, authors, and others from all across the US and Canada on our Salty Believer Unscripted page. And be sure to subscribe to the Salty Believer Unscripted on your favorite podcast app, or use these links:
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Far Greater Loss

I've watched a lot of Christians mourn the damage the fire did to the Notre Dame cathedral. It's sad to see a national monument in flames, especially that one. The history is not lost, but the present reminder of it is, meaning we'll have to depend on the stories, unable to see and touch it ourselves.

But more interesting is what the reaction exposes in our own hearts and minds regarding the Church. No, not the cathedral or even other church buildings. Not even systems and services and branding. Not history or tradition. The Church. The living stones Peter talks about in 1 Peter 2:1-12.

Do we mourn the loss of local churches like we mourn the loss of wood and stone?

Many years ago, I was part of a church family that hit a hard spot. It often looked like that local faith-family would disband and then reband with other Christians in other parts of Christ's Church. I moved away and years later I was a part of a church that was helping the still struggling local church; however, the wrongful death lawsuit proved too much. Although the courts sided with the local church, the legal fees meant keeping the building open for that group of believers' use was not possible. They disorganized, scattered, and joined local churches elsewhere. Almost nobody mourned the loss of the building, or the local organization of that faith family, or the witness and mission work they were doing in the area.

I've seen many church plants come to the end of the season God has had for them. They give their resources to other churches and scatter. They morph into the fold of other local flocks. Although sadly, some also fall away. I've seen the same thing happen to older, established churches. In fact, it happened to all the churches we read about in the New Testament. It's just a part of God's plan for his Church and the mission to the world, I suppose. I've also seen churches in the midst of poor health, disunity, or a split die or nearly die. In some cases, men and women professing to be doing the will of God try to kill local churches, sometimes successfully, sometimes not. Few mourn.

Thousands of churches around the world disappear every year. Both the physical structures and systems as well as the local organization of groups of believers. The local church I pastor could be in this spot at any moment. So could yours. So are all of them. It's just the reality of those who are living in this world for the sake of the next.

It might be helpful to examine why we mourn so heavily over the Notre Dame Cathedral. Why do so many make the commitment to rebuild? What drives that? And the investment it will require, what makes us so willing?

When we come to the end, none of the world's best Cathedrals and none of the warehouse buildings used for worship services, and none of the hidden cellars where believers in persecution meet will last. What will last? The witness of these structures leads to things that might last. The resources of these buildings and local organizations serving a specific mission in the community lead to things that might last. Maybe we should mourn of those things more than the wood and stone and tradition and history. Maybe that's what we should seek to build, rebuild, and build some more. Maybe that's where we should invest our energy and prayers and money and tears and attention.

The fire at Notre Dame is a great loss. It's sad. But what might be worse is our loss of concern for the greater things that will last into eternity.

"Patterns of Evidence: The Moses Controversy"

Dr. Bryan Catherman and Jared Jenkins (almost a Dr.), geek out as they discuss the documentary, “Patterns of Evidence: The Moses Controversy.” From time to time, we get a little less practical and a little more nerdy, theological, academic, and steeped in details. But there’s great value in this kind of discussion and the film serves as a wonderful bridge from the basic Christian life and Bible study to the larger topics of academia. In this podcast, we seek to build a bridge and discuss the film and the topic. Listen here:

Find more podcasts like this, as well as many interviews with Christian pastors, professors, authors, and others from all across the US and Canada on our Salty Believer Unscripted page. And be sure to subscribe to the Salty Believer Unscripted on your favorite podcast app, or use these links:
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Unscripted: "When Kids Rebel"

Answering a listener’s question, Bryan Catherman and Jared Jenkins address what the Bible says about outright rebellion and disobedience in children. This is the conclusion of our series, “Parenting and the Bible,” the guys look at what the Bible says about frank disobedience. This is a very challenging issue for parents so it might be helpful to think about the teaching of the Bible on this topic. Listen to the podcast here:

Find more podcasts like this, as well as many interviews with Christian pastors, professors, authors, and others from all across the US and Canada on our Salty Believer Unscripted page. And be sure to subscribe to the Salty Believer Unscripted on your favorite podcast app, or use these links:
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When Are We Done Parenting?

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In this episode of Salty Believer Unscripted, Bryan Catherman and Jared Jenkins explore the question, when are we done parenting? What are our kids ready to become fellow adults? Our goal should be to raise emotionally mature, spiritually healthy adults. How do we know when we’ve got there?

Listen to “When Are We Done Parenting” on Salty Believer Unscripted.

Find more podcasts like this, as well as many interviews with Christian pastors, professors, authors, and others from all across the US and Canada on our Salty Believer Unscripted page. And be sure to subscribe to the Salty Believer Unscripted on your favorite podcast app, or use these links:
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Unscripted: "Parenting and the Brain" (With Dr. Charles Stone)

In our previous podcast, Bryan Catherman mentioned some aspects of brain function, Dr. Charles Stone, and Dr. Stone’s book, Brain Savvy Leaders: The Science of Significant Ministry. It’s a complicated topic that Dr. Stone makes really simple and enjoyable to read. Therefore, we thought we’d invited him on the podcast to get the information correct and see if he might be able to help us understand how the brain influences parenting. He did not disappoint! Listen to, “Parenting and the Brain” (With Dr. Charles Stone).

Find more podcasts like this, as well as many interviews with Christian pastors, professors, authors, and others from all across the US and Canada on our Salty Believer Unscripted page. And be sure to subscribe to the Salty Believer Unscripted on your favorite podcast app, or use these links:
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Parenting and Proverbs 19:18

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Parenting is hard. Proverbs 19:18 and some other proverbs offer good wisdom for parents. In this episode Bryan Catherman and Jared Jenkins continue to look at parenting through the lends of Scripture. Listen to “Parenting and Proverbs 19:18.

Find more podcasts like this, as well as many interviews with Christian pastors, professors, authors, and others from all across the US and Canada on our Salty Believer Unscripted page. And be sure to subscribe to the Salty Believer Unscripted on your favorite podcast app, or use these links:
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The Bible and Parenting -- Anger and James 1:19-20

Is there are place for anger in our parenting toolbox? What does anger produce? How effective is losing your temper with your children? What does the Bible say about this?

Jared Jenkins and Bryan Catherman explore James 1:19-20 and some other verses as they discuss anger and parenting. Listen to this episode of Salty Believer Unscripted, “Parenting and James 1:19-20.

Find more podcasts like this, as well as many interviews with Christian pastors, professors, authors, and others from all across the US and Canada on our Salty Believer Unscripted page. And be sure to subscribe to the Salty Believer Unscripted on your favorite podcast app, or use these links:
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"Holy Noticing" (An Interview with Dr. Charles Stone Jr.)

Dr. Charles Stone Jr. is a pastor, author, and a student of neurological leadership and the brain. His book, Brain Savvy Leaders: The Science of Significant Ministry. Now he has a new book about to publish called Holy Noticing: The Bible, Your Brain, and the Mindful Space Between Moments. Bryan Catherman and Jared Jenkins connected with Dr. Stone via Skype to chat with him about his newest work. The book is available for preorder but the interview is available now.

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Holy Noticing releases March 5th but you don’t need to wait to order it. The price is very reasonable for the 240 page paperback published by Moody Publishers. Also, be on the lookout for a detailed review on this site.

Find more podcasts like this, as well as many interviews with Christian pastors, professors, authors, and others from all across the US and Canada on our Salty Believer Unscripted page. And be sure to subscribe to the Salty Believer Unscripted on your favorite podcast app, or use these links:
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Letters to the Church by Francis Chan

Chan, Francis. Letters to the Church. Colorado Springs, Col: David C. Cook, 2018.

Francis Chan’s newest book, Letters to the Church comes with a buzz because it’s Francis Chan. He knows how to generate a buzz. But there is a limited audience who might benefit from the entirety of this book. The book has some extremely helpful, motivating ideas but as an entire work, it may lead more away from the local church than toward it. Chan’s work has the potential of producing more jaded Christians frustrated with Jesus and his Bride than not.

Chan sees a problem in much of how the American Church is functioning today. I appreciate that he is sounding the alarm but Chan’s over forceful response misses the nuances of the real problem.

Chan is clearly jaded with the Church (as he presently sees it) and he’s making an argument against the so-called-Christian who is not acting like how Chan thinks First-Century believers acted. There are some Christians who are indeed acting in rebellion, sitting in the pew in apathy. There are some who need this sin addressed (as Chan argues). That person should read this book.

At the same time, there are some who haven’t thought much about what the local church could be, and Chan permits them to dream. They might find Letters to the Church exciting and will hopefully lean into the local church rather than walk away. This could be many people in sleepy churches, especially across the Bible Belt. This person should read the book, with caution.

But I’m not convinced anyone outside the two above mentioned groups should pick up a copy. I hate to write this review because Chan has done a great deal for many Christians. He’s motivated millions on some level. His zeal and passion for Jesus and following him radically is motivating. But this book is loaded with problems.

First, I struggle to read authors who make their living from the Christian community by selling books, speaking at conferences, and recording videos on media services like RightNow Media who argue that the local church should be in homes with unpaid pastors and have no financial resources. These same books and conferences are marketed to churches and often hosted in church buildings. The same musical worship that is treated as problematic programming in the book is the same worship found at the conferences where Chan speaks. If Chan believes what he writes, he should stop accepting so many speaking and writing engagements. Or he might look for less harsh and more inviting ways to make changes from within.

Second, Chan idolizes the First-Century Church, or what he thinks the First-Century Church was. He makes arguments from what the First-Century Church was doing, and he assumes those local churches were free from problems. His assumption of those local churches become his gold-standard for what all churches should strive. However, Chan overlooks all of the issues in the Early Church. They had problems with racism (poor distribution of bread in Acts 6 or Peter’s refusal to eat with Gentiles in Galatians 2, for example), difficulties with obedience to the Great Commission (note that they hadn’t left Jerusalem until Acts 8), and theological disagreements about circumcision. Much of every epistle deals with problems in the church. If not for all the issues, we wouldn’t have a good part of the New Testament. And let us certainly never forget the harsh warnings God gave the churches in the divine letters in the book of Revelation. Today’s less-than-perfect Church looks a great deal like the First-Century less-than-perfect Church, but neither looks like the Church Chan is painting.

Third, at times Chan slightly misrepresents God’s Word to lead the reader to his desired conclusions. For example, in the chapter called “Good Shepherds,” his argues that everyone should become a pastor, and everyone is a pastor. Here he writes,

“Contrary to popular belief, we are all called to pastor (a word that simply means ‘shepherd’). Older women are to shepherd the younger (Titus 2:3-5). Parents are to shepherd their children (Eph. 6:4). Timothy was told to teach others what he had been taught (2 Tim. 2:2). We’re all called to be making disciples (Matt. 28:19-20). If you can’t find a single person who looks to you as a mentor, something is wrong with you” (106).

Chan is not wrong about the word from where we get pastor, and indeed it does mean shepherd. In the New Testament, the Greek noun for that word is poimen and the verb form is poimaino. In nearly every English translation, that word is translated shepherd. But this word appears in none of the verses Chan supplied to argue that everyone is a pastor. In all the verses, there is an idea of discipleship and teaching, but pastor or shepherd is not there. No English translation uses the word shepherd or pastor in the verses Chan uses, except he implies that’s the case with his parenthetical statement and he changes the word to shepherd in regard to older women teaching (kalodidaskalous) and encouraging (sōphronizōsin) the younger women and training (paideia) our children.

Ephesians 4:11 does make a case that some are to be shepherds (the poimen noun) who are also teachers (but it’s not the same teacher-word as those used in the selected verses). Also note that Ephesians 4:11 says some, not all, and then some are for maturing the Church. Chan’s handling of the text tosses out the nuances of discipleship, pastoral ministry, and shepherding. Scripture draws clear differences between Paul, Timothy, the elders of the churches, and the Body as a whole. We would be wise to pay attention to those differences rather than adjusting to meet our own purposes.

Also, while I believe every Christian should be making disciples, I am uncomfortable with Chan’s line at the end of the quote that “something is wrong” with a person not presently making disciples. The charge in 2 Corinthians 5 is to call people to be reconciled to God, not to make people into ambassadors. It seems once a person is reconciled to God well, he or she becomes an ambassador. Jesus’ charge to make disciples in Matthew 28 is to make followers of Christ, not to make people into guilt-ridden disciple-makers. There’s a big distinction. Once one is following Christ or reconciled well, he or she naturally becomes a disciple-maker (although a little more training may be necessary at that point). If someone is not a disciple-maker, the fault may rest with the person discipling that individual. God wants us drawing people to himself, not propagating a marketing pyramid by guilt.

Fourth, I appreciate that Francis Chan was concerned that people might read his book out of context and use it as ammo against the Church. He writes,

“I am trying to write with a spirit of unity. While some of the things I write may sound critical, I really am trying to speak in a spirit of grace and unity. One of the worst things that could happen for is for angry people to take these words and proudly confront their church leadership. There is enough division and arrogance in the Church already. I believe there is a way to show kindness and grace toward one another without abandoning our convictions” (25).

However, in the pages that follow, Chan was not gracious with the part of the Church that he’s jaded with. He doesn’t sound like a shepherd or even a caring person. For example, in the chapter called, “Servants” he writes,

“Don’t you see the weirdness in calling people CHRISTian when they aren’t servants? I know we can’t force people to serve, but there has to be something we can do. No team puts up with players who refuse to contribute. No army puts up with soldiers who don’t carry their own weight. Why do churches continue to put up with Christians who refuse to serve? Why don’t we treat selfishness as a sin that needs to be confronted? If Scripture commands us to serve one another, isn’t it a bit strange that we give people a free pass?” (97).

I’m certainly glad Jesus didn’t treat me like the weak link on a sports team or toss me in the brig like a militant dictator. Jesus invites us to join his mission. And Jesus adopts us into his family, not conscripts us into his militia as long as we carry our own weight. Service is an opportunity to join Christ, and caring pastors indeed have a responsibility to call people into that opportunity. At times, there is sin, but not always. It might be frustrating that people aren’t serving Jesus in his church as we might want them to, but if there “has to be something we can do” we might be better praying for these folks and discipling them. Christ called us to make disciples, not build the Church. He said he would do that (Matthew 16:18).

I pastor a church of broken people. Single moms newly following Christ. People just coming off addiction. Confused and jaded believers. Caged-Calvinist. I would hate to demand that they serve when they only see it as another burden or some kind of false way to appease God, but I love shepherding them into opportunities to be the hands and feet of Christ when they are ready to see it that way and Jesus has transformed their view.

Before my wife and I were believers, we slipped into Sunday church serves late and left just as they were ending so we wouldn’t have to engage with believers. We wanted to watch and listen but I wouldn’t have had Christians over to my home or gone to a Christian’s home to discuss faith or likely even become friends. Our only real exposure was a year and a half of slipping into services and leaving. I’m thankful that church was there and they didn’t confront us for not living like authentic Christians. If they had, I suspect we would have walked, never to return. However, in God’s timing and after hearing many messages God saved my wife and me. This is but one example, but it reminds me that not every circumstance fits well into the house-church, roll-up-your-sleeves and get to work expression of the local church. The Body is one Body of many parts. If we only view the Body as the local church, we miss that many other Christians are being the Church as they serve as their part of the whole Body of Christ.

Francis Chan makes many good points in his book, but nearly all of them are overshadowed by the other things he says. I suspect this will be the kind of book people will read and say, “Yeah, this is how the church should be” but then do little to nothing to change their Christian walk. They will harbor extremely high expectations of the church and then be let down when they don’t see those expectations. Even worse, they’ll become jaded with the broken church that Jesus died to redeem. Letters to the Church is a rally cry kind of book without the rally or much action. I like where I thought the book was headed when I read the introduction, but in the end, it was far more noise without substance.

I appreciate Chan’s heart for seeing the American Church desire to follow Jesus in radical ways. I love his passion for the Lord. But as much as this passion is a strength, it comes with a weakness too. If the passion is light, dealing in absolutes when absolutes don’t capture the nuance of reality is the shadowy side of the light. This book might have been much better and much more beneficial had Chan tempered his frustration before putting ink on the paper.

Unscripted: "The Bible and Parenting (Ephesians 6:1-4)"

There’s a very good reason why God tells fathers not to stir up their children to anger, but instead instruct them in the way of the Lord. In our second episode of the Salty Believer Unscripted episode, Jared Jenkins and Bryan Catherman look at Ephesians 6:1-4. This is a series where the guys are exploring what the Bible has to say about parenting. Listen to the episode here or use the player below.

Find more podcasts like this, as well as many interviews with Christian pastors, professors, authors, and others from all across the US and Canada on our Salty Believer Unscripted page. And be sure to subscribe to the Salty Believer Unscripted on your favorite podcast app, or use these links:
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Unscripted: "The Bible and Parenting (Deuteronomy 6:4-9)"

Jared Jenkins has put together a new series for “Salty Believer Unscripted.” It’s a journey into what the Bible has to say about parenting. In this first episode, he and Bryan Catherman look at what is probably one of the top go-to sections of Scripture on parenting— Deuteronomy 6:4-9.

I addition, Jared refers to a specific sermon. Listen to St. Helen’s Bishopgate’s Parenting Day sermon here.

Listen to the first episode of our new series, “The Bible and Parenting” here or with the audio player below.

Find more podcasts like this, as well as many interviews with Christian pastors, professors, authors, and others from all across the US and Canada on our Salty Believer Unscripted page. And be sure to subscribe to the Salty Believer Unscripted on your favorite podcast app, or use these links:
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LifeWay: More than a Bookstore (with Jonathan Howe)

Bryan met Jonathan Howe while on a trip to Nashville. After connecting, Bryan learned much more about the task and purpose of LifeWay. Howe is the Director of Strategic Initiatives and he directs multiple podcasts, websites, and other communication efforts of Dr. Rainer and other leaders within the Southern Baptist Convention. You can also read Howe’s work on Facts and Trends.

Howe, podcasts in a nice studio with high-tech gear and topnotch resources. So we were please that he agreed to be a part of our podcast, which is somewhat different than what Howe is used to working with. Although it’s possible we simply tricked him into it. We say this with a bit of tongue-and-cheek because Howe is quickly becoming a friend of ours and we find the contrast between the two podcasts amusing. Howe was a good sport and a great guest.

Listen to our interview with Jonathan Howe here:

Find more podcasts like this, as well as many interviews with Christian pastors, professors, authors, and others from all across the US and Canada on our Salty Believer Unscripted page. And be sure to subscribe to the Salty Believer Unscripted on your favorite podcast app, or use these links:
RSS Feed | SpotifyiTunes  | Google Play Music | TuneIn | Stitcher

Congratulations Brett Ricley!

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Brett Ricley, one of the Salty Believer Unscripted co-hosts, is leaving Salt Lake on his way to a new ministry position in Iowa. I’m very sad to see him go but happy for the next chapter ahead of him. Please join me in congratulating him as we send him off. Of course, thanks to technology he doesn’t have to be too far from SaltyBeliever.com and once he gets settled into the new job, we might see him back on the podcast.

In the meantime, I thought it would be fun to go back to a podcast we recorded with J.D. Payne. Brett Ricley and Benjamin Pierce were new on the Redeeming Life Church team and both were interns on the podcast (although we never called Brett an intern). This specific podcast was especially fun because of how excited both Brett and Benjamin were about being a part of the podcast with J.D. Payne. It was before we had better on-line gear so Payne’s audio quality over the phone is fairly bad. But it’s still a fun podcast and it highlights the early beginnings of Brett on Salty Believer Unscripted.

Listen to our podcast on church planting with J.D. here or with the player below. It first posted February 15, 2015.

Find more podcasts like this, as well as many interviews with Christian pastors, professors, authors, and others from all across the US and Canada on our Salty Believer Unscripted page. And be sure to subscribe to the Salty Believer Unscripted on your favorite podcast app, or use these links:
RSS Feed | SpotifyiTunes  | Google Play Music | TuneIn | Stitcher